My 3Rs – Revitalize

In the first two posts of this series, I highlighted my thought process in basically the recent past and present.  Today will attempt to bring the investment landscape of the future into focus.  I will be the first to admit that I have a jaded view of the present – i.e., not being aligned with the economic views espoused by the current administration.  The upcoming midterms have the ability to shuffle the deck even further.  The assumption set I used (which easily could be argued with) is:

  • The current administration will continue to be embattled by prior missteps – primarily in vetting – (resulting continuing indictments and guilty pleas)
  • This could be further hampered by loss of one – or both – chambers of Congress
  • I (currently) anticipate no major activity regarding impeachment, 25th amendment or resignation

Basically a recipe for gridlock – which will put the brakes on some of Trump’s more polarizing policies.  Without a Democratic landslide, I don’t see a major rollback but also don’t see further continuation on a partisan path.  Therefore my view is a continuation of trade tensions (notably Canada and China), rising deficits and interest rates resulting in a slowdown in the US economy.  While the economy is currently growing, the metrics I am watching are debt levels (student loan and state government), the inability of rising wages to keep pace with inflation and savings rate.  Though the concerns are endless, a greater domestic focus tends to mitigate much of the risk but bring me to one conclusion: Regular Americans’ disposable income may be in shorter supply next year.

With this theory outlined, it’s time to fit the remaining pieces into my puzzle of a portfolio which allows for roughly 1/3rd allocation to conservative speculation.  Frankly, my outlook is a bet that the US economy has been front-loaded into the midterm elections.  The downside if incorrect is that I’ve added some slower growth positions.  If correct I’ve generated a little alpha.

Tariff Myself

In the spirit of the times, I completed the move of my Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) and Church & Dwight (CHD) positions to M1 Finance.  I plan to add Colgate (CL) as a new position in the near future.  With M1 being a no-fee broker, my intention is to add new funds whenever I purchase toothpaste, mouthwash or deodorant throughout 2019 with the aim for these companies to attain about 2%, 3% and 1% of the portfolio respectively.

Corporate Actions

I intend to ride the M&A wave in addition to selected spinoffs.  I rarely participate in IPOs but do make an exception from time to time.  I continue to add to my banks that have completed two-step conversions.  This month has seen activity in this area as follows:

  • added to GBNK and sold IBTX locking in a total gain of 46.4% (16.3% annual return).  Assuming their merger with GBNK completes I’ll be assigned more shares of IBTX than I previously had.
  • added to SHPG as they received another approval in their merger.
  • Initiated a post-IPO position (from the 30 day over-allotment period) in Amalgamated Bank (AMAL).  This due to their intention to initiate a dividend next quarter.

Averaging Down

Yes, there are times when I’m underwater on some investments, most of these being holdings of less than 1%.  It would be a fair assessment that something was amiss in my initial analysis as several of these are foreign caught in the cross hairs of the strong US dollar.  One reason I tend to scale in to investments is to take advantage of opportunities to average down when my  original premise remains intact.  These tend to be intermittent purchases.

There, in three parts, is my strategy going into 2019.  As my dividend goals for 2018 are close to being met, I am now starting the realignment process so I’ll be hitting the new year with a running start.

I’d love to hear your thoughts the processes you use!

 

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My 3Rs – Revamp

Last post in this series I highlighted my views from the rear view mirror.  Going into 2019 will see more changes than normal.  No I’m not selling any positions but changing the emphasis (allocation) on certain issues.  The game plan is for reinvested dividends and fresh money to gradually swing the portfolio into balance with the new targets.

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The YOC Metric

Every now and again I believe a reminder is in store addressing the reason and rationale for various approaches we take.  One such topic relates to Yield On Cost which can generate passion on both sides of the debate.  One side equates this metric as little more than a head fake while the other swears by its’ value.  As with most issues, the real answer lies in between.  At the very least all sides agree on the definition which per Investopedia is:

Yield on Cost (YOC) is the annual dividend rate of a security, divided by its average cost basis.

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Thoughts on EV Investing

FI Fighter returned from his self-imposed exile with a renewed passion.  Now I’ll be the first to admit that his investing style is a little (ok, maybe a lot) more on the fringe than mine, but his concepts and theories are well-reasoned.  Perhaps the downside to his methods as the timing – not in the sense of timing the market but in having a measure of foresight in developing trends. Being ahead of the curve tends to have drawbacks as Elon Musk can probably attest.

He returned May 18th with a series of three posts/podcasts, one of which garnered my attention.  His views on metals – in particular Lithium – seem to resonate with me. I agree with his general view of market direction, our disagreement would be in the investment manner.  In short I prefer a greater margin of safety with a ‘proven concept’ where he’s all-in on a ‘plausible theory’.

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M1 Finance


M1-Finance

I was sorely disappointed when the Loyal3 investing platform was absorbed into FolioFirst last year.  Sure it had disadvantages and limitations (limited number of stocks, only batch trade) but as in life, you get what you pay for.  A transaction fee of $0 for a buy, $0 for a sale was nothing to sneeze at. With the monthly service fee FolioFirst wanted I figured I’d be ahead in the game by just transferring my shares to my regular broker and paying their $4.95 fee as needed (which isn’t monthly purchases with this group of stocks).  I did look at other alternatives (RobinHood, Stockpile, WiseBanyan) but each had their own drawbacks to my way of thinking.

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Tax Time & Earnings Season

For all the procrastinators out there the deadline is near.  In fact, this year I was one – completing mine yesterday.  This season brings to mind some of the best practices compiled to minimize – or delay – the tax hit, thereby maximizing disposable income published by the Dividend Diplomats.  Though geared towards wage earners, I can be considered a poster child of these practices as one migrates from the accumulation phase of investing.  Over the years the use of many of these strategies have resulted in continued savings well into retirement.  Case in point being a 2017 Federal effective tax rate of  8.04% on a six figure Adjusted Gross Income ($156 of which was earned income).  Take advantage of all of the breaks provided in life as early as possible to reap the rewards (true in investing as well).

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