April 2020 Update

The market staged a little recovery this month seemingly shaking off – or at least minimizing – any effects of the ongoing Covid-19 devastation, due in part to the partial ramp up of the economy in some states.  My state is one where a ‘phased’ approach is underway and there is uncertainty as to whether the peak has been attained (thereby ignoring the federal template).  While the economic malaise is running rampant through the states, it is doubly acute in the oil patch where state budgets (Texas) are dependent on a 4.6% tax on extraction (in a declining price environment) addition to an otherwise robust economy.  It will be an interesting social experiment as to how quick the average consumer will embrace the new reality (capacity limits in restaurants, for one), the ability for these businesses to turn a profit anew and if this throttling can move the needle on the economy (GDP, unemployment) without a corresponding spike in cases and/or mortality.   For one, I’m willing (and able) to wait at least two weeks and reassess at that time.

Due to the broker reshuffling caused by Motif shutting down, I can only provide a close estimate for the month.  Currently about $2,000 (cash, dividends, sells, buys) is in the ether migrating amongst accounts.  A full accounting is probably a week or two out.

Portfolio Value:  An estimated increase of 10.8% versus the 11.26% gain of the S&P.  For the year I’m up 2.06%.  All full share positions have been received by my primary broker with.

Dividends:  As previously acknowledged, my dividend increase run rate was not sustainable.  This came to bear in April with a 7.49% year-on-year actual increase.  I don’t think I lost any dividends with the timing of the transfer, but I may take a slight temporary hit as I await the cash to redeploy it.  Also some of the cycles will change as I exit some issues.

The pace of dividend cuts/suspensions continues to increase while any increases tend to be muted by 2019 standards.  Net increase for the portfolio stands at 5.75%, meaning my 10% dividend growth rate goal is in jeopardy.

Strategy Shift: In probably an overabundance of caution, I’ve decided to exit REITs that have a retail focus.  If the crisis is prolonged, rents, vacancy rates, property values and ability to refinance could come under pressure.  The ones retained are the four industrial and specialties in my portfolio.

I borrowed this illustration from one of my companies (BOKF) and modified it for my portfolio to begin to gauge potential impacts.  Currently PEP and KO’s biggest impact would reside in their fountain drinks (restaurants and venues).  I have yet to calculate a total …
Covid-19 Impact Areas

Entertainment & Recreation
Gambling Industries EPR
All Other CMCSA, DIS, T, AMC, PEP, KO, MSG, BATRA
Retail
Convenience Stores & Gas Stations CASY, VLO, CVX, RDS.B
Restaurants CBRL, YUM, YUMC, SBUX, MCD
Specialty OUT
All Other Retail KIM, SRC, WRE, VER
Hotels MTCPY
Churches & Religious Organizations CMPGY
Colleges & Universities SYY
Airlines LUV, SWRAY
Identified Businesses most impacted by Covid-19 mitigation efforts approximately xx.xx % of portfolio

I’m using this template strictly as a guide.  The retail facing REITs are all sold (with the exception of Kimco), Southwest Airlines has been reduced, the others on this list are cautious holds.  I continue the review of my portfolio with an eye on secondary impacts – like who really considered any impact to banks because church services weren’t being held?  I probably need to expand my thought process to include further knock-off effects.

Later in May I’ll update my posted portfolio – once the confirmations (and money) arrive.  What will be clearer is the shift to larger but fewer holdings.  While the portfolio remains sizable, I will retain  some speculative stocks and a few where I remain undecided.  By and large, banks with no dividend growth or ones where M&A prospects have dimmed will be pruned.  In June I expect to exit ETFs as well.  For the near term (12-24 months) I’m willing to accept a lower dividend yield if I gain quality – and limited Covid-19 exposure – in return.

Here’s hoping your month turned the corner!

March 2020 Update

Certainly a month for the record books with the dual blows of the Russia/Saudi oil war and Covid-19 wreaking havoc on portfolios.  Coupled with a bear market unlike any other leaves many licking their wounds and pondering their strategies. At this juncture, proven methods like dollar cost averaging, credit evaluation and retained earnings analyses are more valuable than ever before as the discussion moves towards longevity of the crisis and corporate survivability.

For the month, the S&P index dropped 14.3% while my portfolio dropped 13.51%.  While I typically don’t report cash positions, I will say my first quarter reallocation plan (almost completed) has increased my cash position to 7% rather than the typical 0-1% I carry.  If this cash is included, the net portfolio drop was 6.57%. In these days, cash is king for the moment and at least I have some dry powder to redeploy. For the year (ex-cash) I’m beating the index by 2.53%.

Continuing with the Monthly Recap in its newest iteration, I’m still finding pieces that require some elaboration in order to rationalize it.

The net purchase expense threshold is not a pure indicator of my cash position.  The Incr/Decr from the market — 98.95% of the portfolio volatility was due to the market.  Dividend Raises more than offset my one cut. My full position sales were NWL (receipt of a SEC subpoena), EPR (exposure to AMC and Social Distancing constraints) and MAIN (a BDC with exposure to small business lending).

Dividends:

  • March delivered an increase of 30.91% Y/Y with most of the increase attributable to the migration of the majority of my Canadian holdings into my IRA with timing resulting in some double payments (both taxable and IRA).
  • Dividend increases averaged 8.06% with 25.82% of the portfolio delivering at least one increase (including 1 cut and 1 suspension). This is off last years’ pace and a direct by-product of the global pandemic.
  • 2020 Dividends received were 30.34% of 2019 total dividends. The YTD run rate is 106.5% of 2019, slightly under my 110.0% goal. 

As an aside, Justin Law notes “53 companies declared higher dividends in the past month (March), with an average increase of 7.16%”.  While my YTD 8.06% is in the ballpark, I am cautious of going forward potential cuts or suspensions.  For instance, Coca-Cola Amatil maintained their prior dividend noting the dual headwinds of the Australian wildfires and now Coronavirus.  This I consider a positive although I take a shave on the exchange rate.

Spinoffs:

On Oct 4, 2018 MSG filed a confidential Form 10 to spin the sports business which will become effective on April 17th.  Madison Square Garden Sports Corp will begin trading under the symbol MSGS and the new company, Madison Square Garden Entertainment Corp. will trade under the symbol MSGE.  Each existing MSG share will receive 1 share of MSGE and subsequently convert to MSGS.

Mergers:

Spirit MTA REIT (SMTA) voted on Sept. 4th, 2019 to approve the liquidation of the REIT. I am awaiting the final settlement payout and as of December 31, this issue was delisted. I fully expect a profitable outcome for one of my most speculative positions.

Splits and Stock Dividends

Although splits are technically agnostic, I consider them a positive with reverse splits a negative.  TU had a 2:1 split.

Tax Season

Yesterday marked my end to tax season with my returns turned into the Post Office for delivery.  During my investment “career” I’ve thrived under tax schemes where I paid as much as a 37% effective rate while realizing over the years that minimizing the tax hit has a direct correlation to wealth creation.  What I dislike more than anything is change as my strategies generally can’t turn on a dime. I experienced this during the Reagan years and again in the Trump years. My effective tax rate has generally been between 12-17% (after loopholes, deductions and credits) with one audit resulting in a tax refund.  My prior Trump Tax plan bluster was due more to the forced change to my strategies than to the outcome – although I think it was shortsighted to increase the debt in flush times. The Trump Tax plan, I’m proud to report, after a year of restructuring has rewarded me with a new record low tax rate of 1.67% proving it pays to incorporate tax strategy into ones’ investing strategy.

Summary

With the health of you and your loved ones paramount – stay safe.  My reading pleasure during my home time includes the economic history surrounding 1918.  Here’s one interesting tidbit along those lines.

February 2019 Update

Given the Coronavirus impact on the market, my monthly review will be abbreviated with a planned return to normalcy next month.  That said, the portfolio was essentially flat with the S&P, both down – -9.18% for the index and -9.43% for me. The difference is an increased cash position which if I included would put me down 8.78%.  Dividends rose 26.71% year on year but this is misleading as I timed the moves (actually buy/sell transactions) of my Canadian stocks to my IRA post ex-dividend date as best I could to duplicate several of the dividends.  

Positions sold: TD Ameritrade (pending merger), Nutrien (a little leery of China’s ability to buy ag products per trade deal) and Invesco’s Timber ETF (is a slowdown looming?).

Positions Added: Vonage (a free one, so I’ll probably hold for a year) and Coca-Cola Japan (hoping the Olympics aren’t cancelled).


Now that we have a correction, what next?   First and foremost, ensure your investing plan accommodates this type of black swan event.  Next listen to multiple news sources to separate the hype from the reality. For instance, the World Health Organization upgraded the risk of spread on Friday.  Also on Friday, a somewhat flippant Mick Mulvaney said, “what I might do today [to] calm the markets is tell people turn their televisions off for 24 hours”. The President held a Saturday press conference where he “called for calm … and tried to reassure the nation that the threat was under control”.  Are you reassured?

I take my cues from warnings and conference calls.  On Friday I was presented with my first dividend cut of 2020 – AMC Theatres.  This is one I won’t sell on the cut for three reasons.

  1. I had suspected this when I bought my most recent tranche and I bought enough to pretty much offset the cut
  2. They are on the front lines of any potential virus impact
  3. They are doing it the ‘Warren Buffett’ way

The December drop (when I last bought), I did check the debt maturities first.  In their call they stated, “when there is real uncertainty in the world, we’re going to be conservative and keeping cash in our pockets to make sure that — what I think might be somewhat irrational fears the market has had over the past few days don’t turn out to be rational fears.”  In addition to the dividend cut, management is taking a pay cut replaced with out of the money options.  Their priorities have become deleveraging first and rewarding owners via buybacks – which are paid out of retained earnings.  

Frankly, I would not be surprised if others follow in AMC’s footsteps.  Many foreign companies currently pay dividends at rates fixed to an earnings range.  Should these times persist, perhaps earnings take a hit. How many US companies have retained earnings sufficient to weather more than a few quarters and still fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, research and development, marketing or debt reduction?  If not, do they have the financial strength to sustain accumulated deficits? (Consider the energy sector in this regard).

Another interesting tidbit from the call was the comment, “we do not have business interruption insurance for the coronavirus”.  It turns out that many insurance companies exclude viruses in a post-SARS world.  Those that did not modify their policies or underwriting may have an impact in today’s world. This aspect was not analyzed for purposes of this post.

If the President is correct in asserting the threat (is) under control, we probably don’t need to be concerned with the financial stability of other public facing companies, such as restaurants, travel and leisure or retail.  But that position, while projecting strength, belies the fact that supply chains are being stretched, production lines are at reduced capacity and the consumer’s capacity to spend is turning cautious.

While the WHO is urging calm, perhaps as a counter to Jim Cramer’s posturing, respected analysts, such as Mohamed El-Erian are weighing in on potential rate cuts being unable to stabilize the markets, arguing a medical solution is the only weapon.  I suspect he’s correct and perhaps a solution is available sooner rather than later.

I don’t pretend to know which way the will markets react – only that increased volatility is probably here for a while.  What I do is gather information and attempt to find flaws or weaknesses in possible outcomes to determine scenarios that might be profitable. Do your own due diligence, but my guess is medical solutions are priced into the stock price already.

Long: VG, AMC, CCOJY

January 2020 Update

What a way to start the new year.  Beginning with the reshuffling of my portfolio and continuing right into earnings season and the inevitable debate over the Coronavirus impact on the economy … all I can say is yep it’s a lot to digest – and it’s only January.  With the gyrations in the market, all but two of my low-ball limit orders executed, probably the most controversial being MTR Corporation – the Hong Kong high speed rail line recently at the forefront of the protests. Anyway, I added two Canadian companies (Fortis and TMX Group – (Toronto stock exchange)) and starting the long rumored whittling of some of the non-core holdings (XRX and MSGN).  Most of the other action was moving Canadian companies from my taxable accounts to the IRA – some of which were done as a rebalance to minimize fees (hence the slight additions to the other holdings). Also selling part of the PB stock (which went overweight due to a merger) to fund these movements. As I indicated last week, this is the first of a multi-month transition. Obviously my timing was decent (this time, anyway) as the S&P lost 0.16% for the month while my portfolio gained 1.81%.

PORTFOLIO UPDATES

DIVIDENDS

My primary focus resides on dividends with the goal being a rising flow on an annual basis.

  • January delivered an increase of 22.73% Y/Y primarily the result of last years’ dividend cuts rolling off.
  • Dividend increases averaged 11.48% with 8.5% of the portfolio delivering an increase.
  • 2020 Dividends received were 1.86% of 2019 total dividends putting me on target to exceed last year’s total in November. The YTD run rate is under my 110.0% goal but I anticipate this will normalize as my portfolio movement becomes clearer and the current year begins to distinguish itself from the last. 

Note: I updated my Goals page to provide a visual of these numbers.  Based on Mr All Things Money’s instruction set with a conversion to percentages.  My code only updates when the monthly Y/Y number is exceeded.  Otherwise, the prior year actual is used.

AT A GLANCE

Inspired by Simple Dividend Growths reporting

The relationship between market action and purchase activity was roughly 95/5.  As I’m generally playing with ‘house money’ (proceeds from sales, M&A activity and dividends), I doubt there will be a significant variance until I fund my 2019 IRA contribution.  The Net Purchase Expense being less than 1 or 2% illustrates the ‘house money’ concept. Timing did play a part as I sold early in the month (before the drop) and most of the purchases were in the latter part of the month. 

SPINOFFs

On Oct 4, 2018 MSG filed a confidential Form 10 to spin the sports business which remains in progress.

MERGERS

Spirit MTA REIT (SMTA) voted on Sept. 4th to approve the sale of most assets to HPT for cash. A second vote was held to liquidate the REIT. The first payment was received and awaiting final settlement payout. Fully expecting a profitable outcome for one of my most speculative positions.

SCHW to acquire AMTD for 1.0837 sh SCHW to 1 AMTD.  My only surprise with AMTD being taken out was the suitor – I had expected TD.  Regardless, I have three concerns over this deal, 1) profit margin compression with the onset of $0 fee trades, 2) possible liquidation of a partial TD stake to reduce their ownership share from 13.4% to 9.9% (the same issue Buffet regularly faces) and 3) 10 year phase-out of AMTD/TD cash sweep account relationship.  The third one means TD has a low cost (albeit, decreasing) source of deposits for the foreseeable future. After the first of the year, I’ll probably cash in AMTD and increase TD a little further.  

SUMMARY

Overall, the only complaint is the sluggish start to the year. Minus the drag from last years’ dividend cuts I figure this will be short lived.  On my goals, progress was made as follows:

  • Scenario 1 – TD is now confirmed
  • Scenario 2 – Half complete, awaiting timing issues for the sell part
  • Scenario 3 – Determination of maximum contribution amount complete
  • Scenario 4 – 2020 RMD amounts identified

Here’s hoping your month was successful!

2019 Year End Report

Looking back at last years’ End Of Year post, the concerns raised at that point all remain valid.  I have to admit that even with the evils of tariffs, rising deficits and US dollar strength the economy remained surprisingly strong.  I did nail one right – the administration’s claim that GDP growth can outpace the deficit was wrong. If it can’t be done when the economy is hitting on all cylinders – the question becomes ‘when can it?’

For the month, the S&P index rose 2.73% and my portfolio (excluding October and November purchases) rose 4.26%.  When those purchases are included, the monthly increase was 10.51%. Yes my gain would have been larger had I re-invested the dividends throughout the year but at least I was fully in the market during the last quarter run-up.  For the year the S&P rose 30.43% (depending on how it’s calculated) the best year since 2013. My Portfolio rose 34.54% allowing me to extend my claim of the 34th year (of 39) that I’ve beaten the index.

Dividend cuts were the big obstacle for the year as I endured five in total.  Frankly, it wasn’t until December that my Dividend Goal (10% annual increase) was in the bag.  This is typically attained in late October or early November. 

I have only three new companies on my watch list with limit orders in place on two.  All are foreign with Canada, Hong Kong and Japan tagged. I have a few I’m willing to shed with a couple more needing repositioning due to mergers.  For the first time in probably five years I’m in a position to reduce my holdings while beefing up my Anchor and Core positions.

Thirteen countries were represented in my portfolio (18.5% of my dividends), losing Ireland but gaining Japan via a merger.  The top countries were Canada (9.77%), UK (2.61%), Singapore (1.21%) and Sweden (1.02%). I’m continuing the migration of Canadian companies from my taxable accounts to my IRA to take advantage of the tax treaty (no Canadian tax withholding for most issues).

Continuing with the Monthly Recap in its newest iteration, I’m still finding pieces that require some elaboration in order to rationalize it.

For instance, the net purchase expense threshold is not a pure indicator of my cash position.  I’m thinking it’s in the 2-3% range as my cash position increased last month despite the purchases.  The Incr/Decr from the market — yes, 99.2% of the increase in portfolio value was due to the market.  A slight disappointment is the Dividend Raises. They weren’t enough to even round up to 0.01% (more a reflection of portfolio size than wimpy raises).

Dividends:

  • December delivered an increase of 40.87% Y/Y with most of the increase attributable to the Oct/Nov purchases, the OMI fiasco of last year aging off and a weaker US dollar (finally).
  • Dividend increases averaged 10.11% with 68.28% of the portfolio delivering at least one increase (including 5 cuts.  Basically a lackluster performance.
  • 2019 Dividends received were 13.78% greater than 2018 dividends and exceeded last years’ total on December 1st.  It would have been over 15% had there been no cuts.

Note: I updated my Goals page to provide a visual of these numbers.  Based on Mr All Things Money’s instruction set with a conversion to percentages.  My code only updates when the monthly Y/Y number is exceeded.  Otherwise, the prior year actual is used.

Spinoffs:

On Oct 4, 2018 MSG filed a confidential Form 10 to spin the sports business which remains in progress.

Mergers:

Spirit MTA REIT (SMTA) voted on Sept. 4th, 2019 to approve the liquidation of the REIT. I am awaiting the final settlement payout and as of December 31, this issue was delisted. I fully expect a profitable outcome for one of my most speculative positions.

SCHW to acquire AMTD for 1.0837 sh SCHW to 1 AMTD.  My only surprise with AMTD being taken out was the suitor – I had expected TD.  Regardless, I have three concerns over this deal, 1) profit margin compression with the onset of $0 fee trades, 2) possible liquidation of a partial TD stake to reduce their ownership share from 13.4% to 9.9% (the same issue Buffet regularly faces) and 3) 10 year phase-out of AMTD/TD cash sweep account relationship.  The third one means TD has a low cost (albeit, decreasing) source of deposits for the foreseeable future. After the first of the year, I’ll probably cash in AMTD and increase TD a little further.  

Although XRX is officially off the list with their Fujifilm settlement, Icahn & Co. couldn’t wait for the ink to dry before stirring things up with HPQ.  As of now, I am considering exiting my XRX position.

Splits and Stock Dividends

Although splits are agnostic, I consider them a positive with reverse splits a negative.  Two of my companies split this year – PWOD and FFIN with no reverse splits to report.

Five companies showered me with shares of stock ranging from 3% to 5%.  I do love stock dividends and this year the benefactors were: CBSH (5%), HWBK (4%), LARK (5%), AROW (3%) and CVLY (5%).

Summary

As we slide into tax season, we’ll see if my readjustments panned out.  My goal was to achieve the 0-10% tax bracket by taking a one year tax hit.  The first part was completed so the results will be evident in the next month or so.  Overall, not one of my better years but I did attain (at least) my minimum objectives.   

Hopefully your year was great or at least in line with the market. 

November 2019 Update

Alright, I do have a bias.  Generally I don’t pay much attention to Jim Cramer, but his recent attention grabbing headline did pull me in.  “Owning too many stocks and not enough cash can set you up for failure: Cramer” was the title.  As one who owns 200+ issues, I’m always on the lookout for alternative views.  My expectation was for the sage advice to be essentially “have a war chest and shopping list at the ready”.  But rather it was, “Limiting your holdings can be a great tool for investors who don’t have the time or the drive to do their homework for 20 or 30 different companies”.  The essential message being if you “own more than 10 stocks, you might want to consider paring back”. Say what? This recommendation doesn’t even provide exposure across all sectors. So what to do if like me you have an overabundance?  Sell, he says. “Sometimes, it can be as simple as selling some stocks and getting some cash on hand. Go sit on the sidelines — nothing wrong with that.” Very true if one has a knack for timing the markets. My methods aren’t for everyone either as my emphasis is on consolidation, typically M&A – which results in slightly higher mediocrity for this portion of my portfolio with the aspiration of getting a tape measure homer.  As they say, the devil is in the details. His view was apparently honed as a trader rather as a buy and hold type of investor as he states, “I would analyze every losing trade … I realized that good performance could be linked directly to having fewer positions”. Okey dokey, ‘nuff said ….

Certainly a long and roundabout way of saying the market was basically on an upward tear this month with only a few down days.  Try timing that movement! So the S&P rose a stellar 3.9% – the best since June while my portfolio – including the purchase spree I’ve been on – rose 9.84%.  Excluding the final round of purchases – even with no fresh money being used – the portfolio value rose by 2.43%, a tad below the index, probably due in part to buying at elevated levels.

PORTFOLIO UPDATES

  • increased my PB position and lost LTXB (merger).  I’m now overweight PB as my position doubled which I’ll reduce in the next tax year.
  • New Position – PBCT and lost UBNK (merger)
  • increased my WFC position (replication strategy)
  • New Position – KFC  (replication strategy)
  • New Position – PG (replication strategy)
  • increased my YUMC position basically as a rebellion against the President’s antics.  They derive 100% of their sales, all of their profits, no imports or exports (all domestic), and their entire supply chain is in China.  Yet they are incorporated in Delaware and pay a USD dividend. The major question is currency exchange on their P&L statement and the president’s delisting campaign.
  • increased my TD position (IRA).  I’ll increase it further and sell my taxable account shares after the first of the year.
  • New Position – KNBWY – another statement selection – message being , “Mr. President, play with tariffs all you like but there are Japanese companies other than car manufacturers employing thousands of Americans”.  Besides, I see their sales improving in 2020 with the Olympics being in Japan and it fits my bottler strategy.

DIVIDENDS

My primary focus resides on dividends with the goal being a rising flow on an annual basis.

  • November delivered an increase of 15.51% Y/Y.
  • Dividend increases averaged 10.11% with 68.72% of the portfolio delivering at least one increase (including 5 cuts). This is off last years’ pace and I believe a new personal record for dividend cuts in a single year since about 1980.
  • 2019 Dividends received were 99.63% of 2018 total dividends putting me on target to exceed last year’s total on December 1st. The YTD run rate is 110.76% of 2018, slightly over my 110.0% goal. Point of reference, this is the first time since starting this blog that I didn’t exceed the prior year dividends before the end of October.

Note: I updated my Goals page to provide a visual of these numbers.  Based on Mr All Things Money’s instruction set with a conversion to percentages.  My code only updates when the monthly Y/Y number is exceeded.  Otherwise, the prior year actual is used.

AT A GLANCE

Inspired by Simple Dividend Growth‘s reporting

Key thing I’m looking at is the ratio between market action and purchase activity. This month was roughly 80/20. I suspect most months will be 95/5 as I rebuild the war chest. Another point of interest was the M&A cash exceeding my dividends. I can assure you this is a rare occurrence. It will be interesting to see what I track going forward.

SPINOFFs

On Oct 4, 2018 MSG filed a confidential Form 10 to spin the sports business which remains in progress.

MERGERS

VLY to acquire ORIT for 1.6 sh VLY to 1 ORIT. This merger will result in a slight dividend cut November forward as the rate will be normalized to VLY’s current rate. In my view, the other positives outweigh this negative.  Should close December 1st.

Spirit MTA REIT (SMTA) voted on Sept. 4th to approve the sale of most assets to HPT for cash. A second vote was held to liquidate the REIT. The first payment was received and am awaiting final settlement payout. Fully expecting a profitable outcome for one of my most speculative positions.

SCHW to acquire AMTD for 1.0837 sh SCHW to 1 AMTD.  My only surprise with AMTD being taken out was the suitor – I had expected TD.  Regardless, I have three concerns over this deal, 1) profit margin compression with the onset of $0 fee trades, 2) possible liquidation of a partial TD stake to reduce their ownership share from 13.4% to 9.9% (the same issue Buffet regularly faces) and 3) 10 year phase-out of AMTD/TD cash sweep account relationship.  The third one means TD has a low cost (albeit, decreasing) source of deposits for the foreseeable future. After the first of the year, I’ll probably cash in AMTD and increase TD a little further.  

Although XRX is officially off the list with their Fujifilm settlement, Icahn & Co. couldn’t wait for the ink to dry before stirring things up with HPQ.  As of now, I am considering exiting my XRX position.

SUMMARY

Overall, the only complaint being not exceeding last year’s dividend haul until December. The culprits being five dividend cuts and merger timings (a couple of completions were accelerated to avoid a payment). My cash position is close to zero, but with replicating the kids’ portfolio complete, I expect this to rapidly change to rebuild a stash for my next sizable purchases (unless market conditions warrant), expected in tax season.

Here’s hoping your month was successful!

October 2019 Update

On the 1.9% Q3 GDP growth rate, “The Greatest Economy in American History!” as contrasted with the 1.9% Q1 2012 growth rate under the prior administration, “Q1 GDP has just been revised down to 1.9%. The economy is in deep trouble.

As tweeted Oct 30, 2019 and May 31, 2012 by the now president, Donald Trump

With renewed optimism for a China trade deal (again), generally good earnings reports (though there were a few snags) and additional rate cuts in this Great Economy – perhaps to spur growth to the promised sustained 4%+ envisioned with the tax cuts (doubtful) – the markets did achieve new records. In spite of all this noise, the S&P rose 2.0% and my portfolio – sans purchases – rose 2.0%. I did deploy funds that were previously generated by the portfolio, accounted for in my reports , but then stashed in an interest bearing account. When incorporating these funds (repeat – no fresh money was used), the portfolio value rose by 8.65%. So, yes, purchases can have an impact on the portfolio. Imagine the potential results if it was “new money” and I had some years to let it run.

PORTFOLIO UPDATES

  • increased my LTXB position going into the PB merger
  • increased my JNJ position on weakness
  • Performed a partial rebalance resulting in slight increases to AROW, BANF, BKSC, BRKL, CVLY, FMBH, LSBK, NWBI, TMP, UMBF and WFC
  • New Position – GIS
  • New Position – WMT
  • New Position – UNP
  • New Position – RDS.B
  • New Position – HSY
  • New Position – TXN
  • New Position – ATO
  • New Position – T

DIVIDENDS

My primary focus resides on dividends with the goal being a rising flow on an annual basis.

  • October delivered an increase of 7.49% Y/Y.
  • Dividend increases averaged 10.27% with 66.52% of the portfolio delivering at least one increase (including 4 cuts). This is off last years’ pace and I believe a new personal record for dividend cuts in a single year since about 1980.
  • 2019 Dividends received were 93.01% of 2018 total dividends putting me on target to exceed last year’s total in mid-November. The YTD run rate is 108.77% of 2018, slightly under my 110.0% goal – but still recoverable. Point of reference, this the first time since starting this blog that I didn’t exceed the prior year dividends before the end of October.

Note: I updated my Goals page to provide a visual of these numbers.  Based on Mr All Things Money’s instruction set with a conversion to percentages.  My code only updates when the monthly Y/Y number is exceeded.  Otherwise, the prior year actual is used.

SPINOFFs

On Oct 4, 2018 MSG filed a confidential Form 10 to spin the sports business which remains in progress.

MERGERS

XRX merger with Fujifilm cancelled (still being litigated). The expected settlement was disallowed by the judge September 13th.

PB acquired LTXB for 0.528 shares and $6.28 cash for each LTXB share which completed November 1st. I plan to pocket the cash and sell the old shares – retaining the new PB shares.

VLY to acquire ORIT for 1.6 sh VLY to 1 ORIT. This merger will result in a slight dividend cut November forward as the rate will be normalized to VLY’s current rate. In my view, the other positives outweigh this negative.

PBCT acquired UBNK for .875 sh PBCT to 1 UBNK – completed November 1st. I plan to hold this one as I wouldn’t be surprised if PBCT gets taken out at some point.

Spirit MTA REIT (SMTA) voted on Sept. 4th to approve the sale of most assets to HPT for cash. A second vote was held to liquidate the REIT. The first payment was received and am awaiting final settlement payout. Fully expecting a profitable outcome for one of my most speculative positions.

SUMMARY

Overall, no complaints. The initial quote can also bear reference to the growth rate of my portfolio this month – which is why I presented the results in two ways. Although accurate, I do not care to be viewed as tilting the scales in favor of one narrative over another. My cash position will hover close to zero while replicating the kids’ portfolio but expect the dividend growth to accelerate into the first half of 2020 with this strategy.

Here’s hoping your month was successful!