For Your Reading Pleasure

Every so often I update my directory omitting inactive or defunct blogs and generally get a feel for what the temperature is in the worlds I frequent less often.  This exercise was all the more telling in the general mood within the community.  One example being Young Dividend‘s monthly recap in which he notes, “Although the portfolio value fell, it is interesting to see that the dividend growth graph of my portfolio continues to climb upwards.“.  In a nutshell that is the reason we choose DGI.  Another analysis on staying the course comes from Time In The Market.  Points I like to keep in mind when the markets are volatile.  My friend Tom over at Dividends Diversify scooped my original thought for the week with his Can You Save Money at a Farmer’s Market piece.  My focus was on the Community Kitchens used by many of these vendors.  That concept will be fleshed out  further and arrive at some future point in time.

All good reads which I encourage you to partake.


Not to beat a dead horse, but I’ll  touch a bit more on Bank OZK which was one of last week’s topics.  Turns out The Dividend Guy featured this stock on his podcast the day before its precipitous drop.  To his credit he published a mea culpa on which the Seeking Alpha version received mixed reviews.  In my view, his laser focus on the dividend growth blinded his peripheral vision.  Not looking a little harder under the hood, so to speak.  Wolf Richter‘s  piece on the potential asset bubble in Commercial Real Estate (CRE) can highlight reasons a broader view is warranted at times.


Since I mentioned Wolf Street, a couple of additional articles grabbing my attention (including the comments) were, Why I think the Ugly October in Stocks Is Just a Preamble with a compelling argument and What Truckers & Railroads Are Saying About the US Economy.

Full disclosure: Long CASS whose data is the basis for his article.

As we come into the final week of the month, though my portfolio is down my dividends are up for the month, quarter and year.  The only suspense being the magnitude of increase!

 

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My Overseas Guidebook

Over the past few months I’ve visited several blogs when one topic in particular has been addressed. For the past year or two I’ve been expanding my international holdings to my current mix which is highlighted below. Time In The Market got me thinking with his comment.  Although he tends to be more an ETF investor, he was experiencing similar trends as I.  Then there was Bert’s CM purchase.  He was agnostic to the CAD/USD correlation probably because the US and Canadian markets are usually tightly correlated with exchange rates.  Then there was Tawcan, illustrating his top five.  In his post he mentioned his use of ETFs for international diversification.  Finally there was The Dividend Pig musing on portfolio hedging.

My endeavors in overseas investing have delivered an education of some obscure items that hopefully will benefit an investor looking out of country.

Create a Strategy

Before starting, perform your due diligence and run an issue through your screening algorithm.  Then ask the question, “Is my home currency overvalued?”.  In the case of US investors, the simpler question is “Do you believe Trump’s policies will result in a stronger or weaker dollar?” and secondarily, “To what degree?”.  I like to use foreign exchange as a tailwind.  But by investing in dividend stocks in the event I’m wrong the sting is mitigated.

Be Aware of Monthly Deviations

Currency fluctuation will result in either positive or negative moves in both portfolio value and dividend amounts.  As an example January to August 2017 saw the US dollar depreciating against most currencies.  One example is the Euro which has appreciated 8.95% since last October – making US exports cheaper and imports more expensive.  One anomaly with the currencies I track – the relative value has been stable when compared to each other whereas the US dollar has been the outlier.  Also many companies pay annual dividends or interim/final (with variable amounts) dividends.  Some are capped at a percentage of profits.

Be Wary of Tweetstorms

In recent months, fluctuations have occurred as the result of Presidential tweets.  Most recently was the posturing on NAFTA.  This was a buying opportunity for Canadian and Mexican issues.  Conversely, dividends received took a hit.

Understand the Tax Implications

The US engages in tax treaties on a country by country basis which establishes the withholding rate and the application of said rate.  Ones that I’ve found with caveats include Canada (15% unless in an IRA and a part of DRS – then no withholding), Australia 15% (unless reduced via franking), Singapore – verify on a company basis whether dividends are qualified (may impact the decision to place in a taxable or tax-deferred account) and Switzerland (15% if registered, 25% if not – check your broker).  The good news is that at tax time foreign withholding can be credited (with some limits) under current law.

Stay Abreast of Local Events

This can be issues not normally aired in the US such as the Australian deflation discussion (generally groceries) or the Customs workers strike in Chile.  These wildcard issues have the ability to impact the profitability of the investment.

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The lessons I’ve learned have been many and these are but a few.  However, foreign investing can be rewarding as long as there is an awareness.

A Look ‘Down Under’

It’s been about two years since I first invested in Australian issues, choosing to take a slow approach while I obtained some practical experience first hand.  Certainly many of the yields are good, but the economy – much like Canada – is resource based.  Then there’s the whole franking deal.  Plus the foreign exchange conversion – but this has been relatively stable at 75 – 80 cents per USD.  Add to that, until recently the selection was limited to ADRs or using a cost prohibitive foreign desk.

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