2017 Mid Year Correction

Each year I establish a basic plan to govern my investing activity based on sectors, segments or locales able to deliver a little alpha to my portfolio.  The past couple of years had a focus on the Financial industry with the outcome being rewarded with mergers (small banks) and outsized dividend increases (money center banks).  I also began increasing my Canadian allocation in 2015 from 2.5% of my dividends to the current 8.6%.  Since the election, I was accelerating the increase in my other foreign holdings to the current 13.6% on two theories, 1) gridlock in Congress would persist as the Republican majority would be too narrow to push through sweeping changes, and 2) this inaction would result in a weaker dollar.  It appears I was correct on both counts as the US dollar is now at an eight month low.

With my alpha agendas now too pricey (at least for slam dunk results), a re-prioritization is in order. With the Fed Chairs’ testimony this week indicating that GDP growth of 3% would be difficult, the Trump agenda which projects a higher growth rate is likely in peril – even ignoring the self-inflicted wounds.  Without an improvement in the GDP, deficit hawks will be circling.  It is likely the last half of the year will present some opportunities, but my view these will be predicated on external events.  My eyes will remain open to the USD exchange rate – on strength I may buy foreign issues.

My portfolio allocation between holdings labeled Anchor, Core and Satellite have been imbalanced for a year or two primarily due to merger activity and the acceleration of adding foreign issues.  Now that the major mergers have completed, the last this past January, and other alternatives are slim, I figure it’s time to get back to basics.

My going forward strategy can be summarized as follows:

  1. Non-US equities when secured at a favorable exchange rate
    a)I have 2 Japanese, 2 Swiss, 1 UK and 1 Swedish company on my watch list in the event an attractive price presents itself
  2. Assess corporate actions (spins, splits, mergers) for opportunities
    a) Generally I’m agnostic to splits except when the result would be a weird fractional.  I can easily manage tenths or hundredths of shares.  Smaller sizes are troublesome so I avoid when possible.
    b) Spins (and mergers) are assessed to prevent (if possible) weird fractionals.  For instance, I added to my MET position earlier this month as their spin will be at a ratio of 11:1 which would have otherwise delivered a weird fractional.
  3. Assess portfolio for average down and other opportunities
    a) An example of this was last months’ purchase of KSU.  To this end, I recently updated my Dividends (Div Dates) Google sheet to flag when the current price is lower than my cost basis.
    b) An example of “Other Opportunities” would be BCBP which is resident in my Penalty Box due to dilution.  The dilution (secondary) might be explained (now) with their announced acquisition of the troubled IA Bancorp.  If the regulators provide their seal of approval, it may be time to remove BCBP from Penalty status and perhaps add to this 3.5% yielder.
  4. Add to holdings that are below target weighting
    a) This is where I expect most of my second half activity to reside.

Of my 26 stocks labeled Anchor, Core or Satellite; 5 can be considered at their target weight (within .5% of the target) and 4 I consider to be overweight.  The remaining 17 will receive most of my attention.  As most of these rarely go on sale, I’ll likely ignore price and place a higher priority on yield and events – at least until I’ve exceeded last years’ total dividends.

The following table highlights this portion of my portfolio:

JAN/APR/JUL/OCT

COMPANY TYPE PORT DIV%
Kimberley-Clark/KMB A-(6%) 4.01%
First of Long Island/FLIC C-(3%) 0.85%
Sysco/SYY C-(3%) 1.81%
Bank of the Ozarks/OZRK C-(3%) 0.67%
PepsiCo/PEP S-(1.5%) 1.51%
First Midwest/FMBI S-(1.5%) 0.3%
Comcast/CMCSA S-(1.5%) 8.32%
Toronto-Dominion/TD S-(1.5%) 1.58%
NOTE: Not all payment schedules coincide completely

FEB/MAY/AUG/NOV

COMPANY TYPE PORT DIV%
Clorox/CLX A-(6%) 3.68%
PNC Financial Services/PNC C-(3%) 0.30%
Legacy Texas Financial/LTXB C-(3%) 1.48%
Starbucks/SBUX C-(3%) 1.07%
Blackstone/BX S-(1.5%) 2.58%
Apple/AAPL S-(1.5%) 1.26%
Lakeland Bancorp/LBAI S-(1.5%) 1.04%
Webster Financial/WBS S-(1.5%) 0.82%
NOTE: Not all payment schedules coincide completely

MAR/JUN/SEP/DEC

COMPANY TYPE PORT DIV%
WEC Energy/WEC A-(6%) 5.61%
3M/MMM C-(3%) 0.76%
Home Depot/HD C-(3%) 7.32%
Blackrock/BLK C-(3%) .22%
ADP/ADP C-(3%) 1.60%
Southside Bancshares/SBSI S-(1.5%) 0.96%
Chevron/CVX S-(1.5%) 9.52%
Norfolk Southern/NSC S-(1.5%) 1.99%
Flushing Financial Corp/FFIC S-(1.5%) 0.99%
Wesbanco/WSBC S-(1.5%) 1.14%
NOTE: Not all payment schedules coincide completely

I will provide the caveat that this plan is subject to not only the whims of  the market but of my own as well.  In addition, this plan may be changed if/when a better idea comes along.

6 Degree Investing

Six degrees of separation is the theory that everything is six or fewer steps …
“Invest in what you know (coupled with serious fundamental stock research)” attributed to Peter Lynch
“Own What You Love” Loyal3 slogan
These are common themes used widely among investors. Presuming due diligence has been performed and ones minimum requirements are attained it makes perfect sense. One example is my granddaughter’s portfolio. Each Christmas she receives a stock that she can relate to and one with a company sponsored DRIP. Her first was General Mills as she liked Lucky Charms. When she studied US history it was Washington Gas Light (WGL) as they keep the Capitol lit. Over the years her portfolio has grown to also include Hershey, Walmart, Procter & Gamble, Union Pacific, Disney and Kraft-Heinz. This year’s addition was Texas Instruments since she applied – and was accepted – to a high school sponsored in part by them. It is a moderately diverse portfolio, but more important is the fact that she can identify with it.  Although none are owned through Loyal3, it is a kind of Own What You Love portfolio.

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Ode to the Mantra

It would appear that another fixture in the DGI community has bitten the dust.  I don’t know the full story – and I doubt many do – but whether it was greed, misrepresentation, miscalculation, lack of understanding, or a combination of these Dividend Mantra is no more.  Long Live The Dividend Mantra Team?

Reviled by some, but revered by many, through his knowledge and hard work successfully monetized his passion.  From media  interviews to authoring a book, he built the Dividend Mantra brand from nothing to something.  But his most lasting accomplishment is the number of people that became investors through his inspiration.

This is not to say I agreed with all of his decisions, I didn’t.  Orchids Paper is not a DGI stock.  It’s yield chasing.  I was surprised when he added it.  Yes I own it – but I’ve been to their Oklahoma plant.  And I reduced my holdings prior to their secondary.  He and I also disagreed on his decision to sell Sysco.  So it’s dividend wasn’t growing fast enough?  Well when you buy into a company just after the ex-div date and sell it prior to an ex-div date you’ve artificially reduced your return. He had a extreme dislike for the YoC metric, I tend to favor it.  His doubling into BBL is questionable, particularly with their exposure to Materials and China.  It could wind up being very profitable but their loss of a dam at their Brazilian mine last week doesn’t help.

His overall success has been well documented, which makes this latest chapter all the more perplexing.  Previously he stated a desire to offload the work required with his blog’s popularity.  He obviously was a willing seller and he located an obviously willing buyer.  My guess is after the contracts were signed, DM realized he gave up editorial control, evidenced by his post that some blog sections would no longer be published.  Likewise, the buyers have come to realize (belatedly) that a blog’s popularity is a reflection of its creator – not the owner.

Is it now too late to recover?  Well the jury’s still out.  I fear that DM the man will be late to realize he has lost – perhaps destroyed – the orchestra.  It is unfortunate the benefits he enjoyed will be diminished as well.  And DM the team is obviously late to recognize they bought the music but not the conductor.  Meanwhile the patrons are fleeing to the exits.  Any hope for recovery is reduced by the day.

Portfolio Structure

Whimsical Dividends recently wrote a piece on monthly dividends – posing some good and thoughtful questions.  So rather than answer in a lengthy response, I figured this would be a good starting point for my weekly (or thereabouts) post.

When I first started investing one of my goals was to build a monthly paying portfolio.  This goal was achieved many years ago.  But when I retired, I guess I had too much time on my hands so I wondered if it was possible to build a weekly paying portfolio.  To this end I have pretty much succeeded.

My research began with Dave Fish’s CCC list.  A wonderful repository of data.  I also used articles by Dividend House as a resource.  Although she’s a recent convert to DGI, and I’m not at all in full agreement with some selections, her style and illustrations make her a must read.

My end result is I have placed 26 companies (of about 105 in my portfolio) into three categories, segmented by quarter, with two payees per week.  The result is (almost) weekly payments.

(updated 26 Oct due to PNY merger)

1 A Kimberly-Clark KMB 1 C PNC Financial PNC 1 A WEC Energy WEC
2 C Piedmont Nat. PNY 2 A Clorox CLX 2 C 3M MMM
3 C Sysco SYY 3 C Legacy Texas LTXB 3 C Home Depot HD
4 C Bnk of The Ozarks OZRK 4 C Starbucks SBUX 4 C Blackrock BLK
1 S PepsiCo PEP 1 S Blackstone BX 5 C ADP ADP
2 C First Long Island FLIC 2 S Apple AAPL 1 S Southside Banc. SBSI
3 S Comcast CMCSA 3 S Lakeland Bancorp LBAI 2 S Chevron CVX
4 S Lake Sunapee Bnk LSBG 4 S Webster Financial WBS 3 S Norfolk Southern NSC
 2  S  First Midwest  FMBI 4 S Flushing Financial FFIC
5 S Wesbanco WSBC