Portfolio Breakdown by Geography

I’m always intrigued by how investors position themselves in providing a measure of protection against market downturns.  Most common is sector diversification where the theory is a downturn in one area of the economy is offset by outperformance – or at least stability – in other areas.  DivHut recently posted his quarterly sector review which – as he indicated – is reasonably aligned with his risk tolerance and goals.  The weakness in this approach is his low exposure to Technology or in my case an overexposure to Financials.  So long as potential weaknesses are identified, this approach does allow a portfolio to be tilted towards sectors which the investor believes will outperform the broader market.

Another approach was presented by Roadmap2Retire last March where the attempt was made to isolate the geographic revenue diversification of the companies he owned.  A daunting effort to be sure, but I’m not sure the data he obtained was complete.  As an example, he reports BCE’s revenue as 100% Canadian.  That is likely as reported in filings.  Not reported is their 37.5% stake in Maple Leaf Sports which owns the Maple Leafs (NHL) and Raptors (NBA).  The NBA pays revenue sharing in US dollars (not Canadian).  Basically any minority stake, investments or joint ventures with other companies are likely to be excluded from any of the companies he owns.  The question becomes – is this revenue identifiable and negligible?

The approach I take is – first sector and secondly the country where the company is headquartered.  Dividends paid are recorded post exchange to US currency which does result in some fluctuation based on the relative strength (or weakness) of the dollar.  The following table illustrates the non-US source for roughly 15% of my dividends.

8.98% Canada
0.53% United Kingdom
0.04% Bahamas
2.44% Australia
0.13% Ireland
0.32% Mexico
0.00% China*
1.29% Hong Kong
0.20% Chile
0.26% Luxembourg
1.47% Singapore

* no dividend paid at this time

The UK dividends are set to increase once a merger involving one of my US companies is complete.  I may be forced to slow foreign purchases as recent political events have resulted in the US dollar weakening and the Yen and Swiss Franc strengthening.  If so, I’m sure I can find a few US companies to put my money into!

 

 

Rolling Unabridged Update #1

Last month I introduced the Rolling Unabridged Monthly Portfolio (RUMP).  The primary reason was to attempt to identify Herd Mentality tendencies within the DGI community.  My first assumption is that there may be a 6 to 9 month lag from identification to purchase.  My database now carries an eight month lag which I expect to reduce a little further over the next month or two.

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The One Metric

Investment Hunting just started a Blogger Interview series with an interesting interview with Roadmap2Retire a few days ago (June 21). One question in particular caught my attention, If you could only use one metric to evaluate a stock, which one would you choose? Sabeel’s answer was spot on in my book (I don’t think there is one metric that can be used to evaluate stock. If everything could be boiled down to one single number, investing would be easy. The reality is that investing in a company is a multifaceted aspect and there a hundreds of things to consider – both from a qualitative and quantitative standpoint.), but led me to ponder the proverbial what if: If there were only one which would it be?

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Hiding In Plain Sight

“cant see the forest for the trees”

Simply that you have focused on the many details and have failed to see the overall view, impression or key point.  Urban Dictionary

I find it interesting when multiple unrelated occurrences converge and coalesce into a singular thought.  Case in point:

  • Investment Hunting did a financial quiz with one of the questions being “I’ve never bought a stock on OTC Markets?” Wallet Squirrel’s response (presumably tongue-in-cheek) was, “No, no idea (what) that is. “Octopus Tentacle Club”?”
  • DivHut presented his June 2016 stock considerations with a response by Tawcan being, ” … I continue to like V, SBUX, National Bank (not sure if they’re listed in US market) …”

It dawned on me that there was a lack of understanding regarding the OTC (over the counter) market.  Without getting into the nuances (grey, pink, etc.), let me just that a significant benefit to US investors is unprecedented access to foreign markets – notably Canada, but also Australia, Singapore and more.  In this post, I’ll focus on Canada.

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The -opoly World

Early Retiree Reality (ERR) recently published a thought provoking article titled My Duopoly and Oligopoly Shopping List on Seeking Alpha.  The premise is essentially that duopolies and oligopolies provide wider moats which results in greater profitability.  I would encourage you to read it.  This idea is similar to one I’ve been working on with my Speculative Pillars series on Cord cutting, Transaction Processing and to a lesser degree Regional Banks.  Although neatly packaged, I failed to make the leap into the –opoly world.

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Oil Patch Lenders

In his recent Chatter Around The World post, Roadmap2Retire presented a snapshot detailing banks exposure to the energy sector.  A timely piece with the spring borrowing base redeterminations around the corner.  It was a little bit of a rude awakening since a nice chunk of my portfolio is posted in full color.  Although I did comment on the minimal issues I had, like any good article it got me to consider multiple questions.  Has the thesis changed since purchase.  Am I losing any sleep?  Is my investment at risk?  Is the landscape different?  What are my real issues with the master list?   Can I quantify the risks?  Let’s try to figure it out …

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6 Degree Investing

Six degrees of separation is the theory that everything is six or fewer steps …
“Invest in what you know (coupled with serious fundamental stock research)” attributed to Peter Lynch
“Own What You Love” Loyal3 slogan
These are common themes used widely among investors. Presuming due diligence has been performed and ones minimum requirements are attained it makes perfect sense. One example is my granddaughter’s portfolio. Each Christmas she receives a stock that she can relate to and one with a company sponsored DRIP. Her first was General Mills as she liked Lucky Charms. When she studied US history it was Washington Gas Light (WGL) as they keep the Capitol lit. Over the years her portfolio has grown to also include Hershey, Walmart, Procter & Gamble, Union Pacific, Disney and Kraft-Heinz. This year’s addition was Texas Instruments since she applied – and was accepted – to a high school sponsored in part by them. It is a moderately diverse portfolio, but more important is the fact that she can identify with it.  Although none are owned through Loyal3, it is a kind of Own What You Love portfolio.

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