Observations – r2019.4.7

Last weeks’ update mentioned the – at that time – inverted yield curve. The economists views on what this portends is all over the map from impending recession to this time is different. A couple of articles on Seeking Alpha address these concerns, with Christopher VanWert advocating a position in Consumer Staples and bonds and the self-professed contrarian Peter Schiff spinning a more ominous conclusion. My take? It’s always wise to be aware of all possibilities when setting a course. Banks – moreso the community banks – will bear the brunt of any prolonged inversion setting the stage for potential further consolidation. It might be too late for a meaningful increase in Staples as they’ve become rather pricey of late. Bonds may be an alternative but still carry a premium to what I’m willing to pay. Not mentioned are utilities as they have a perceived sensitivity to interest rates. What is often overlooked is that regulated utilities have the ability to pass this through to their customers, albeit with a delay. My action items will – first and foremost – address the speculative portion of my portfolio to de-risk to a degree.

It’s a little gratifying when other bloggers see a social issue in a similar vein, as in Bert’s piece on stock buybacks. Other issues gaining traction – outside my rants last month – found their way over to Dividend Ninja with his take on the low unemployment rate. As he is Canadian, the US centric version would also have to consider the acceleration of expensing as part of last year’s tax plan – the result being companies getting a tax break to increase automation to increase throughput (or reduce headcount). Also of note is his piece on dividend cuts. I’ll acknowledge cuts may be a sign of proactive management but it is easily a sign of mismanagement – especially when triggered by debt covenants. Most investors don’t have the time or energy to sort through the issues – hence the common rule of thumb, Sell on the news.

This week will be decision time – did I allow enough cash to accumulate to pay the tax man (or woman). I scaled my reinvestment back during the quarter so we’ll see if I have to sell a little or not. Interestingly, an analyst on CNBC last week attributed the slow-down in new car sales to the surprises in store with the tax plan. That has me wondering if that could translate into the housing market OR if that’s why the Trump team is so driven for the Fed to cut rates?

As always, comments are welcome and have a good week!