Reporting Style Update

On my “to-do” list was to refine my monthly results presentation to make it more relevant – particularly in light of the significant movements in my portfolio of late.  In search of ideas, I stumbled across the Simple Dividend Growth methodology. While not exactly what I had in mind, it covered probably 80% of which I could mix, match and modify to my hearts’ content.

His presentation covers Weekly actual and Forward Annual views, illustrated below.

XXX is text, $$$ currency

The largest differences are that I report monthly (as opposed to weekly), I convert actuals to percentages and I don’t use forward anything (except announced cuts) preferring to use trailing actuals.

The more subtle differences are twofold, I embrace stock dividends and M&A activity (one of his sell signals is a merger announcement).  So I’ve enhanced this template to serve my purposes as follows:

Actual as of 16 Nov 2019

The left column contains all ticker symbols – essentially a point of reference for portfolio activity.  The right column is the activity – as a percentage of portfolio value. The exception being the Dividends which are percentages of dividend activity.

I’ve segmented my new buys between the source of funds – the default being dividends accrued from prior months.  I don’t show my available cash as I reserve the right to spend it on my tax bill (like last April), take a trip or – in this case – replicate the granddaughter’s portfolio.  I may add a “new cash” line item in the event I hit the lottery or my living expenses decrease, otherwise I expect to continue funding purchases via excess funds generated by the portfolio.

I’m not sure how relevant the separate itemization of increases will be, but I’ll let it run for now.  In this example, BX increased their dividend but it doesn’t register as it amounts to 0.001962% – thereby rounding to 0.00%.  This becomes even more negligible when ORIT’s dividend cut is added. Likewise, the increase from stock dividends and DRIPs may also be too small to be meaningful.

The key point I wanted to visualize was the delta between market fluctuations and dividend growth.  Since my purchases are (generally) self funded by the portfolio, the fields: Increase from New Buys, Less Dividends, Less M&A cash and Incr/Decr from Market Action should equal 100%. 

The selfish reason?  After the four dividend cuts I experienced to start 2019, my assumption was the market was in for a rough year and I went into a little of a retrenchment mode.  My cash position rose and my purchases decreased. Now my dividend run rate is below normal – I might exceed 2018 dividends by month end which would be a month later than usual.  I’m used to coasting into the fourth quarter starting some positioning moves to get a head start for the new year. 

I’m thinking dividends deployed for purchases should be in the 3-5% range.  If I had used this method earlier in the year I probably would have realized faster how far I was lagging behind.

The term M&A Cash may be a little bit of a misnomer as a merger may be the trigger for multiple portfolio transactions which can be illustrated through this example.  The PB/LTXB merger was a cash and stock transaction and I owned both sides – PB in my IRA and LTXB in a taxable account. The cash was received this month.  I will sell PB in the IRA replacing it with TD and finally selling the TD in the taxable account. Excess cash in the IRA was used to create a TD starter position there. However, this daisy chain of events will occur over roughly two months to maximize the dividend payments.  The sales of the (current) overweight PB position and the soon to be overweight TD position will be classified as Positions Reduced.

Others present their results in a manner I found interesting including Dividend Driven and Wallet Squirrel.  Tom at Dividends Diversify had suggested creating an index. This solution is less complex but equally illustrative (I think).  I will probably track (perhaps on the side) the Buys to Dividends ratio as a correlation to market value (think “be greedy when others are fearful”) as this presentation may reflect increased buys when the market drops (or failure to do so).

So I’ll lay it out here for ideas, thoughts and discussion and intend to use it starting with my November review.

Just a Few Dribs and Drabs

To review this week’s market action is to basically yawn for a change.  Earnings season began but was tempered to a degree by economic news that questioned the robustness of the US consumer.  While the economy is still growing, the rate is slowing. My view remains that without a ‘real’ deal – skinny or otherwise – on the table between the US and China, both countries will continue to hobble along.

Meanwhile I did make one purchase this week that was a little unanticipated, but not totally unexpected.  I topped up my Legacy Texas (LTXB) holdings in preparation for the completion of the merger into Prosperity Bank (PB) which has received regulatory approval.  Currently I hold both sides of this merger, LTXB in a taxable account and PB in my IRA. Essentially I wanted to avoid assignment of an odd fractional share that I could do nothing with as the ratio is 0.875:1 (plus $6.28 cash). Assuming shareholder approval October 29th, the expectation is for the deal to close November 1st.  My current thinking is the new PB shares (and cash component) will be assigned to the taxable account. Subsequently, I intend to sell the old PB in my IRA replacing it with TD (to take advantage of the tax treaty).  After the dust settles, I will sell the TD in my taxable account. End result being more shares (slightly) of both PB and TD, no shares of LTXB and some excess cash.

I did hit the halfway point on my endeavor to replicate the grandkid’s trust (now liquidated, save one stock).  After I complete the transactions I’ll post regarding the rhyme and reason, but for now let’s say it’s to preserve all options regarding financial assistance as she begins the college application process. 

The strategy I’ve employed is to gauge the futures market for weakness prior to entering an order for market open as I decided to use M1 finance for the bulk of this replication.  For the most part, this has been a viable approach except of late there have been some wild swings going into the open. I’m unsure as to the why, but perhaps someone has identified the secret sauce regarding presidential tweets?

The effort remains ongoing regarding the directory update – primarily removing dormant entries.  It turns out I wind up spending more time than usual as my attention gets diverted by an interesting presentation or difference of opinion or a concept worthy of further review.  Examples of some of these include:

  • Dividends Diversify – in his review of the book Dividends Still Don’t Lie, the comment, “I did some searching on the internet for free services. But didn’t come up with anything that looked useful … Dividends Still Don’t Lie goes through how the calculations are done.  So it is certainly possible for a do it yourself investor to develop the calculations on their own.” garnered my attention.  Now the strategy discussed may be an anathema to a Buy and Hold type (my concern would be tax implications), the “tool” became the curiosity.  The best I could come up with was the Charles Schwab screener that could only analyze three of the book’s eleven metrics yielding fifteen possibilities for further manual research.
  • Finance Journey – the comments, “As a dividend investor, my full focus is on income than capital gain. Thus, capital gains or losses in my investments do not make any sense to me at least for now.” and “I do not convert dividends received from U.S stocks to Canadian dollar, and I use a 1 to 1 currency rate approach to keep the math simple and avoid fluctuations in my dividend income reports due to changes in the exchange rate.” were the culprits.  I trust the “full focus” does not exclude possible warning signals. For instance, many dividend cuts (income) are preceded by a falling stock price (capital gain (loss)). Likewise, the use of a 1:1 exchange ratio for simplicity sake risks masking the true portfolio performance. Personally, I (like ETFs) translate income from my thirteen foreign holdings to home currency prior to publishing results. Besides, if the full focus is income why distort currency exchange (which is a direct income factor)?
  • Finance Pondering is a relatively new blog from the UK that is in the process of ramping up in a thoughtful manner.  The insightful questions raised in this rollout carry the promise of one day being one of the standouts. Yet there is already one nagging question that I hope will be answered in the future – “Why Trainline?”.  To enlighten my audience, Trainline is a ticket booking company that charges a premium in exchange for convenience in what is basically a mobile app. My issues are, 1) it was a 2019 IPO (albeit one of the better ones), 2) KKR was involved (can you say monetize and exit strategy), 3) I question the nature of Brits to embrace premium services given the uncertainty of Brexit and recent demise of Thomas Cook.  

This weeks’ final thought is a potential black swan.  My concern is the expanding pockets of unrest appearing from Hong Kong to Chile to Spain.  Ignoring Turkey/Syria for now, just something I’m keeping my eyes on …

Summer Vacation

I didn’t have to wait too long for turmoil to reemerge.  Apparently the President is unaware of the concept of a vacation as the barrage of libelous, racist, bullying, slanderous and lying tweets continued unabated.  It makes me wonder at times if Jack Dorsey has any regrets of the monster he has enabled. Although it is easy to digress into the madness, I must remain centered, mindful that this is a blog with an investing focus.  Therefore we need to backtrack a little to set the stage for Friday’s meltdown.

Ignoring the slightly left bent of this article, this week’s drama was highlighted by Fed browbeating and a tantrum as a result of a measured Chinese response to additional tariffs imposed by Trump.  Possible additional measures – not mentioned in the article – include of all things a devaluation of the US dollar. Since the Fed is asserting a measure of independence, it appears the only recourse to further Trump’s agenda is through the Treasury Department.  This all culminated on Friday which coincidentally was the eve of the G7 summit. Going into the weekend, the Dow dropped 623 points. My guess is the drop was a little greater than it should have been as positions were probably closed going into the weekend with an aura of uncertainty in the air.

The talking heads really went to town on all of this with the “probability” of a recession increasing in many analysts’ eyes.  Remembering that a recession is defined as two consecutive quarters of negative GDP growth, I don’t see this in the cards as yet.  However, if the consumer bears the brunt of any downturn, it will surely feel like one. 

With this in mind – and also as most of my available cash for the month was previously allocated – I had minimal opportunity to play Friday’s slide.  I had previously set $100 aside as the minimum price for admission to the Webull platform that Tom at Dividends Diversify had reviewed. Basically, on a new platform, I dip my toes in at the minimum level, play around and test the waters before jumping in.  I took it as a sign that my final approval and funding was completed on Wednesday.

The one complaint I have with Webull (so far) is their desktop version is in beta and currently has limited functionality – forcing most activity to a smart phone.  This is probably only an issue for those of us with disabilities. Outside that, it performed in line with Tom’s review.

The enrollment offer had two free stocks which I promptly claimed.  The ones assigned were MFG and ERIC.  Interesting that both are ADRs which could be off-putting to some given the foreign taxes, fees and exchange rates – but they are dividend payers, MFG semi-annually and ERIC annually.  They both have intriguing storylines in that MFG could benefit from ongoing US/Japan trade talks and ERIC could see some benefit with the US blacklisting of Huawei. Neither of these were on my radar but I’ll hold these for now and with the market value being $11.03 getting an unrealized 11% gain for one weeks use of my money.  If only that were to continue … 

My Friday rampage continued by initiating two new positions, both with stories of their own.  CSCO, another 5G opportunity, reported lackluster results and Genpact which was a GE spinoff. GE remains their largest client which may strengthen further if recent allegations against GE prove to be true.  I’ll probably add one more position to the Webull account then pause while I figure out the ins and outs of the app. If you are interested in their promotion, this referral link can be used.

Rampage in this context is a misnomer, but I couldn’t resist.  I guess the real question is whether Trump decides to be civil with our allies at the G7 with a reset towards a united effort against China or if he decides to continue with a self-serving path where an increase in market volatility will result.  Keep your seat belts fastened!

Tax Efficiency

I figured a little reflection was the order of the day as we recently completed tax season in the US, and yes, I had to pay for the first time in years. My initial take was Trump’s tax law did no favors to those of us on fixed incomes – rather tilting the scales to benefit the wealthy and to a lesser degree the working class – though there were winners and losers across the board. In preparation for next year’s fiasco, I’ve been attempting to ascertain some of the intricacies of the changes. Previously, I opined on the foreign tax credit remaining in place. Today’s revelation potentially turns conventional wisdom on REITs on its’ head.

Sage advice has typically been – with a few exceptions – REITs are best held in tax advantaged accounts, like IRAs. The new tax law adds a few wrinkles to this concept, which Justin Law outlines nicely. The essence of his piece is that Section 199A distributions now have a 20% deduction which may warrant a review how tax advantageous REITs are in ones tax deferred versus taxable portfolio. DGI darling Realty Income (O), recently reviewed by Tom at Dividends Diversify, could well be a poster child for this type of analysis as last year’s payouts were 77.1% Section 199A and the remainder Return of Capital. The delay in this week’s post was due to some difficulty in completing a review of the fourteen REITs in my portfolio.

Two of my REITs were excluded from this analysis as I have them classified as probable sales, Uniti as their dividend cut was likely a debt covenant issue and Lamar as their IRS reporting is not straightforward (the corporate filings differ from the filings on the shareholders’ behalf). As all of my REITs are in taxable accounts, using Justin’s generic template, they were first ranked by the new Section 199A exclusion.

  1. American Tower (AMT) 99.68%
  2. EPR Properties (EPR) 95.94%
  3. Washington RE (WRE) 91.89%
  4. Outfront Media (OUT) 86.10%
  5. Iron Mountain (IRM) 83.04%

The next tier combined Qualified dividends and Cap Gains as their tax treatment is similar (and not onerous):

  1. Duke Realty (DRE) 22.59%
  2. Kimco Realty (KIM) 18.29%
  3. Prologis (PLD) 17.33%

The one tier I need to keep an eye on is the Return on Capital with Vereit (VER) 86.17% and Crown Castle (CCI) 34.39%. This part of their distribution is tax deferred until sold or the cost basis reaches 0.

The ugly tier is the Section 1250 gains with a 25% tax rate.

  1. Spirit Realty (SRC) 49.2%
  2. Spirit MTA REIT (SMTA) 21.2%

I consider this to be a one-off due to the spin of SMTA from SRC. Kimco (26.94%) could fit in this category as well although my sense is that their portfolio repositioning is the culprit, but there are opposing views to mine.

Bottom line, I’m willing – even eager – to pay taxes. Yet the rules of the game reward those able to minimize the government’s share. While the key resides in understanding the nuances of the rules, I say, “Seek the rewards and let the games begin!”

For Your Reading Pleasure

Every so often I update my directory omitting inactive or defunct blogs and generally get a feel for what the temperature is in the worlds I frequent less often.  This exercise was all the more telling in the general mood within the community.  One example being Young Dividend‘s monthly recap in which he notes, “Although the portfolio value fell, it is interesting to see that the dividend growth graph of my portfolio continues to climb upwards.“.  In a nutshell that is the reason we choose DGI.  Another analysis on staying the course comes from Time In The Market.  Points I like to keep in mind when the markets are volatile.  My friend Tom over at Dividends Diversify scooped my original thought for the week with his Can You Save Money at a Farmer’s Market piece.  My focus was on the Community Kitchens used by many of these vendors.  That concept will be fleshed out  further and arrive at some future point in time.

All good reads which I encourage you to partake.


Not to beat a dead horse, but I’ll  touch a bit more on Bank OZK which was one of last week’s topics.  Turns out The Dividend Guy featured this stock on his podcast the day before its precipitous drop.  To his credit he published a mea culpa on which the Seeking Alpha version received mixed reviews.  In my view, his laser focus on the dividend growth blinded his peripheral vision.  Not looking a little harder under the hood, so to speak.  Wolf Richter‘s  piece on the potential asset bubble in Commercial Real Estate (CRE) can highlight reasons a broader view is warranted at times.


Since I mentioned Wolf Street, a couple of additional articles grabbing my attention (including the comments) were, Why I think the Ugly October in Stocks Is Just a Preamble with a compelling argument and What Truckers & Railroads Are Saying About the US Economy.

Full disclosure: Long CASS whose data is the basis for his article.

As we come into the final week of the month, though my portfolio is down my dividends are up for the month, quarter and year.  The only suspense being the magnitude of increase!

 

April Showers

Below the shifting landscape that debates the notion as to whether tariffs are a negotiating ploy or the real deal, some pig farmers are now operating at a loss of thousands of dollars per week (futures markets have priced in tariffs) and soybean growers are considering whether to reduce their plantings to avoid the same fate.  Meanwhile the impact on our NAFTA partners is also being considered across the borders.  Canada can increase their soybean and pork sales to China but the net impact will still be negative to them considering the magnitude of trade volumes.  Mexico is expanding ties to China in an effort to mitigate the ‘Trump’ effect.  All the while, the administration has to be aware that China holds the ultimate ‘trump’ card in the debt held.  Some bearish views posit US interest rates could rise to 14% if China ceases their bond purchases.

With these headlines staring at us, it would be excusable to have missed some of the underlying news – one being in healthcare.  Two of my companies made the news this past week with possible or rumored deals; Shire (SHPG) and Humana (HUM).  Takeda’s interest in Shire has all the appearances of industry consolidation, Wal-Mart and Humana’s discussions are more along the lines of being one of the last gorillas.

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Picking Winners & Identifying Losers

It has been said many times before that attempting to time the market is a fool’s errand. One approach common with Dividend Growth Investors the one taken by DivHut which is to  “…invest in a consistent and systematic manner. Over the long haul, being invested and staying invested in the stock market gives you the best long term odds of success.”  The benefits are consistency, removing emotions and dollar cost averaging while the disadvantages – particularly if fully invested – is the reduced ability to take advantage of “one day sale events” which are becoming more common.

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