July 2018 Update

The markets generally shook off potential tariff impacts, choosing instead to focus on earnings and GDP.  Any future concerns being tabled by investors to essentially celebrate the present.   Being a contrarian by nature brings out the caution signs when the market ignores some warning signals.  Tariff advocates Alcoa and Whirlpool took hits when they acknowledged the benefits anticipated were not materializing as expected.  Signs of profiteering are beginning to emerge.  The list of companies indirectly impacted continues to grow.  Technology had issues due in part to China exposure.  Perhaps I can be forgiven for seeing the glass half empty rather than half full.  This month had me on the sidelines with only one transaction to report.  July saw a rise in the S&P of 3.6% while my portfolio outperformed by registering an increase of 5.36%.  YTD I’m now ahead of the S&P by 1.06%.

Portfolio Updates:

Performed a rebalance on a portion of the portfolio.  I reduced the overage in DGX created in May and added shares to the others in this group (ABM, AMT, ARD, BLL, CASY, CHCO, KOF, CCE, CTBI, CCI, AKO.B, HOMB, IRM, LAMR, OUT, NWFL, OCFC, ONB, PLD, QCOM, SRC, SMTA, BATRA, UNIT, VALU, VER).  My DGX holdings remain higher than they were in May and the increase in dividends on this rebalance is negligible.

DIVIDENDS

My main focus resides on dividends.  Market gyrations are to be expected but my goal is to see a rising flow of dividends on an annual basis.  I’m placing less emphasis on the quarterly numbers as the number of semi-annual, interim/final and annual cycles have been steadily increasing in my portfolio.

  • July delivered an increase of 29.76% Y/Y, the biggest impact being a June dividend paid in July.   Pro-forma was 19%.
  • July delivered a 3.29% decrease over last quarter (April) due to an interim/final cycle (and would’ve been greater without the dividend move).
  • Dividend increases averaged 14.39% with 66.51% of the portfolio delivering at least one increase (including 1 cut (GE).
  • 2018 Dividends received were 70.19% of 2017 total dividends putting us on pace to exceed last year in early November.

Note: I updated my Goals page to provide a visual of these numbers.  Based on Mr All Things Money’s instruction set with a conversion to percentages.  My code only updates when the monthly Y/Y number is exceeded.  Otherwise, the prior year actual is used.

Spinoffs:

GE‘s rail unit to spin then merge with WEB

GE to spin 80% of the health business

Mergers:

XRX merger with Fujifilm cancelled (now being litigated).

SHPG to merge into TKPYY

GBNK to merge into IBTX

COBZ to merge into BOKF

GNBC to merge into VBTX (semi-reverse)

Summary

All in all a good month but it appears my continuing financial overweight is literally reaping dividends.  This probably needs to be addressed in 2019.

Hope all of you had a good month as well.

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June 2018 Update

At month end, the first of the tariffs took effect with the markets basically going sideways while trying to figure the impact.  My impression is the first industry to be impacted (via retaliation) will be the lobster industry.  Other industries will be later as the supply chains run off.  Even the US dollar is taking the noise in stride resuming its’ ascent.  Finally, the CCAR results were released with approval of the majority of the capital return plans of the banking sector (additional dividend growth on the horizon).   Through this I generally stayed the course, the only exception being the implementation of a hedge on two mergers.  June saw a rise in the S&P of 0.48% while my portfolio underperformed by registering a rise of 0.14%.  YTD I still lag the S&P by 0.69%.

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Small Banking Revisited

Periodically I encounter an article that hits at the core of one of my strategies.  As many of  you know, I’m currently a little overweight financials with an emphasis on regional banks.  This was not always the case as I (fortunately) exited the sector in late 2007  reentering only in early 2013.  My five year pause was bookended by what Richard J. Parsons refers to as the Great Panic of 2008-2009.  His article, Finding Alpha In Reliable Dividend Banks(14 June 2017) struck a chord with me and illustrated some of the style I came to embrace for a time. Though I’m not selling my banks, other than special situations, I’m currently not a buyer either.  If you are a bank investor (or considering being one) I’d recommend reading his article.

His article highlights 30 regionals that actually raised dividends during the Panic.  By comparison, my hypothesis was segmented into three ‘buckets’ which were:
1.Good dividend payers
2.Stock dividend payers
3.Acquisition candidates

Although he includes some stock payers (CMBH, AROW, SBSI, and FLIC (roundups on splits)) this is not his article’s focus.  I’ve written on these before so I’ll exclude them.

His article also points out that only one of the original 30 was acquired which is a slight disappointment when one of my goals is to obtain a merger premium.  Several on his list were acquirers which kind of proves my rationale to expand the universe to include potential acquisition targets in my bank holdings a couple of years ago.

Leaving us with his list.  One notable point is his geographic analysis.  “Certain states are more likely to be home to these reliable dividend banks: Indiana, Texas, California, Kentucky, Missouri, and upper state New York.”  This melds with my findings though I attributed this to state regulatory agencies as certain states had disproportionate numbers of bank failures.  Therefore I excluded western (California) and southern US banks.  To his mix, I found Pennsylvania to be a viable candidate as well.  This difference could be that mutual conversions (notably preeminent in PA, NY, NJ, VA and MA) were identified as likely targets by my study.

Another note on his analysis, “…a few critical factors influence long-term success in banking: hands-on expert management…”  In fact he elaborates a little on this in the comment stream.  A tidbit is both Missouri banks on his list were established by the Kemper family.

So the actual question is how do my portfolio holdings stack up against his list?  Half of the thirty are owned.  Of the nine owned by Richard, seven are owned (one obtained via a merger).  One being in California was excluded by geographic screening.  I’m not sure offhand though, why I excluded CBU out of New York.  My primary takeaway from his article was a validation of my strategy and I need to further investigate a few.

His complete list follows:

Access National ANCX 1.4B VA
Arrow Financial Corp. AROW 2.7B NY
Auburn National Bancorp AUBN .8B AL
BancFirst Corp.   BANF 7.2B OK
Bar Harbor Bankshares  BHB 3.4B ME
Bank of Marin Bancorp BMRC 2.0B CA
Bryn Mawr Bank Corp. BMTC 3.3B PA
Bank of Oklahoma   BOKF 32.6B OK
Commerce Bancshares   CBSH 25.3B MO
Community Bank System CBU 8.9B NY
Cullen/Frost Bankers CFR 30.5B TX
Community Trust Bancorp CTBI 4.0B KY
First Capital  FCAP .8B IN
First of Long Island Corp.  FLIC 3.6B NY
Farmers & Merchants Bancorp  FMCB 3.0B CA
Horizon Bancorp   HBNC 3.2B IN
National Bankshares NKSH 1.2B VA
Norwood Financial Corp.  NWFL 1.1B PA
Bank of the Ozarks OZRK 19.2B AR
Prosperity Bancshares  PB 22.5B TX
People’s United Financial, Inc.   PBCT 40.2B CT
Stock Yards Bancorp  SYBT 3.0B KY
Tompkins Financial Corp.  TMP 6.3B NY
United Bankshares UBSI 14.8B WV
UMB Financial Corp.  UMBF 20.6B MO
Westamerica   WABC 5.4B CA
Washington Trust  WASH 4.4B RI
First Source  SRCE 5.5B IN
First Financial THFF 3.0B IN
Southside Bancshares SBSI 5.7B TX
Bold-owned by Richard, Italics-owned by me

Oil Patch Lenders

In his recent Chatter Around The World post, Roadmap2Retire presented a snapshot detailing banks exposure to the energy sector.  A timely piece with the spring borrowing base redeterminations around the corner.  It was a little bit of a rude awakening since a nice chunk of my portfolio is posted in full color.  Although I did comment on the minimal issues I had, like any good article it got me to consider multiple questions.  Has the thesis changed since purchase.  Am I losing any sleep?  Is my investment at risk?  Is the landscape different?  What are my real issues with the master list?   Can I quantify the risks?  Let’s try to figure it out …

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